A DECADE OF THE DUNLAP INSTITUTE
 
2008-2018

MAY 21 2008

The Dunlap Institute is established at the University of Toronto.

The Dunlap Institute is established at the University of Toronto.

The Dunlap Institute is established at the University of Toronto.

SEPTEMBER 2010

Prof. James Graham is appointed as the Dunlap’s first director.
 
Credit: Rita Leistner

Prof. James Graham is appointed as the Dunlap’s first director.
 
Credit: Rita Leistner

Prof. James Graham is appointed as the Dunlap’s first director. <br /> <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Rita Leistner</em></span>

2012

Dunlap scientists, led by Dunlap Fellows Dr. Nick Law, Dr. Jérome Maire and Dr. Suresh Sivanandam, study the feasibility of an astronomical observatory at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic.
 
Credit: Dr. Jérome Maire; Dunlap Institute

Dunlap scientists, led by Dunlap Fellows Dr. Nick Law, Dr. Jérome Maire and Dr. Suresh Sivanandam, study the feasibility of an astronomical observatory at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic.
 
Credit: Dr. Jérome Maire; Dunlap Institute

Dunlap scientists, led by Dunlap Fellows Dr. Nick Law, Dr. Jérome Maire and Dr. Suresh Sivanandam, study the feasibility of an astronomical observatory at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory on Ellesmere Island in the Canadian High Arctic. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Dr. Jérome  Maire;  Dunlap  Institute</em></span>

June 5 2012

Over 5000 people fill U of T’s Varsity Stadium to witness the last transit of Venus of the century using transit-viewing glasses and telescopes. Organization of the event is led by the Dunlap’s Outreach Coordinator, Prof. Michael Reid.

Over 5000 people fill U of T’s Varsity Stadium to witness the last transit of Venus of the century using transit-viewing glasses and telescopes. Organization of the event is led by the Dunlap’s Outreach Coordinator, Prof. Michael Reid.

Over 5000 people fill U of T’s Varsity Stadium to witness the last transit of Venus of the century using transit-viewing glasses and telescopes. Organization of the event is led by the Dunlap’s Outreach Coordinator, Prof. Michael Reid.

July 30 2012

Students from around the world attend the inaugural Dunlap Institute Introduction to Astronomical Instrumentation Summer School, to learn the fundamentals of telescopes, as well as optical, infrared, x-ray and long-wavelength instrumentation. The school attracts some 40 students annually and in 2018 is in its seventh year.

Students from around the world attend the inaugural Dunlap Institute Introduction to Astronomical Instrumentation Summer School, to learn the fundamentals of telescopes, as well as optical, infrared, x-ray and long-wavelength instrumentation. The school attracts some 40 students annually and in 2018 is in its seventh year.

Students from around the world attend the inaugural <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/training/summer-school/">Dunlap Institute Introduction to Astronomical Instrumentation Summer School</a>, to learn the fundamentals of telescopes, as well as optical, infrared, x-ray and long-wavelength instrumentation. The school attracts some 40 students annually and in 2018 is in its seventh year.

July 12 2012

In a paper published in the journal Nature, Dunlap Fellow Dr. David Law and colleagues announce the discovery of a galaxy 10.5 billion light-years from Earth, one of the most distant to exhibit “grand design” spiral arms.
 
Credit: Dr. David Law; Dunlap Institute

In a paper published in the journal Nature, Dunlap Fellow Dr. David Law and colleagues announce the discovery of a galaxy 10.5 billion light-years from Earth, one of the most distant to exhibit “grand design” spiral arms.
 
Credit: Dr. David Law; Dunlap Institute

In a paper published in the journal Nature, Dunlap Fellow Dr. David Law and colleagues announce the <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/a-grand-design-spiral-galaxy-before-its-time/">discovery of a galaxy 10.5 billion light-years from Earth</a>, one of the most distant to exhibit “grand design” spiral arms. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  Dr.  David  Law;  Dunlap  Institute</em></span>

October 4 2012

In a paper published in the journal Science, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tuan Do and his colleagues at the UCLA Galactic Center Group announce the discovery of a star that orbits the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy every 11.5 years, the shortest such orbital period known.
 
Credit: Keck/UCLA; Galactic Center Group

In a paper published in the journal Science, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tuan Do and his colleagues at the UCLA Galactic Center Group announce the discovery of a star that orbits the supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy every 11.5 years, the shortest such orbital period known.
 
Credit: Keck/UCLA; Galactic Center Group

In a paper published in the journal Science, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tuan Do and his colleagues at the UCLA Galactic Center Group announce the discovery of a star that orbits the <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/around-the-milky-way-galaxy-in-11-5-years/">supermassive black hole at the centre of the Milky Way Galaxy</a> every 11.5 years, the shortest such orbital period known. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  Keck/UCLA;  Galactic  Center  Group</em></span>

March 21 2014

The Dunlap Prize is awarded to Neil deGrasse Tyson for sparking a love of astronomy in millions around the world. Tyson delivers the Dunlap Prize Lecture to a capacity crowd of 1500 in U of T’s Convocation Hall.

The Dunlap Prize is awarded to Neil deGrasse Tyson for sparking a love of astronomy in millions around the world. Tyson delivers the Dunlap Prize Lecture to a capacity crowd of 1500 in U of T’s Convocation Hall.

The <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/about/dunlap-prize/">Dunlap Prize</a> is awarded to Neil deGrasse Tyson for sparking a love of astronomy in millions around the world. Tyson delivers the Dunlap Prize Lecture to a capacity crowd of 1500 in U of T’s Convocation Hall.

September 24 2014

Astronomy on Tap, which originated in New York City, comes to Toronto, organized by U of T astronomy students and postdocs. The Toronto event is eventually organized and sponsored by the Dunlap, and grows into one of the largest “Taps” in the world, routinely attracting 500 people, four times a year, for a lively night of talks, games and conversation.

Astronomy on Tap, which originated in New York City, comes to Toronto, organized by U of T astronomy students and postdocs. The Toronto event is eventually organized and sponsored by the Dunlap, and grows into one of the largest “Taps” in the world, routinely attracting 500 people, four times a year, for a lively night of talks, games and conversation.

Astronomy on Tap, which originated in New York City, comes to Toronto, organized by U of T astronomy students and postdocs. The Toronto event is eventually organized and sponsored by the Dunlap, and grows into one of the largest “Taps” in the world, routinely attracting 500 people, four times a year, for a lively night of talks, games and conversation.

January 2015

Prof. Bryan Gaensler is appointed director of the Dunlap.

Prof. Bryan Gaensler is appointed director of the Dunlap.

Prof. Bryan Gaensler is appointed director of the Dunlap.

MARCH 2015

After years of development at the Dunlap, a new instrument joins the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI): Prof. Shelley Wright and colleagues’ NIROSETI, or Near Infrared Optical SETI detector.

After years of development at the Dunlap, a new instrument joins the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI): Prof. Shelley Wright and colleagues’ NIROSETI, or Near Infrared Optical SETI detector.

After years of development at the Dunlap, a new instrument joins the search for extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI): Prof. Shelley Wright and colleagues’ NIROSETI, or Near Infrared Optical SETI detector.

AUGUST 13 2015

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) collaboration announces its first discovery: 51 Eri b, an exoplanet orbiting a star 96 light-years from Earth. Astronomers at the Dunlap, including then Dunlap Director, Prof. James Graham, played a key role in developing GPI, a ground-breaking instrument designed to directly image planets orbiting stars other than the Sun.
 
Credit: J. Rameau (UdeM) and C. Marois (NRC Herzberg)

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) collaboration announces its first discovery: 51 Eri b, an exoplanet orbiting a star 96 light-years from Earth. Astronomers at the Dunlap, including then Dunlap Director, Prof. James Graham, played a key role in developing GPI, a ground-breaking instrument designed to directly image planets orbiting stars other than the Sun.
 
Credit: J. Rameau (UdeM) and C. Marois (NRC Herzberg)

The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) collaboration <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/first-discovery-for-a-new-planet-finder/">announces its first discovery</a>: 51 Eri b, an exoplanet orbiting a star 96 light-years from Earth. Astronomers at the Dunlap, including then Dunlap Director, Prof. James Graham, played a key role in developing GPI, a ground-breaking instrument designed to directly image planets orbiting stars other than the Sun.  <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  J.  Rameau  (UdeM)  and  C.  Marois  (NRC  Herzberg)</em></span>

SEPTEMBER 27 2015

Thousands pack U of T’s King’s College Circle at the Dunlap’s Supermoon Total Lunar Eclipse Viewing Party. Clouds diminish the visibility of the eclipse, but not the crowd’s enthusiasm.
 
Credit: Lorne Bridgman

Thousands pack U of T’s King’s College Circle at the Dunlap’s Supermoon Total Lunar Eclipse Viewing Party. Clouds diminish the visibility of the eclipse, but not the crowd’s enthusiasm.
 
Credit: Lorne Bridgman

Thousands pack U of T’s King’s College Circle at the Dunlap’s Supermoon Total Lunar Eclipse Viewing Party. Clouds diminish the visibility of the eclipse, but not the crowd’s enthusiasm. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  Lorne  Bridgman</em></span>

2016

The Dunlap partners with Julie Bolduc-Duval and Discover the Universe to provide English and French resources, workshops and webinars to help teachers across the country provide astronomy instruction to their students.
 
Credit: Julie Bolduc-Duval

The Dunlap partners with Julie Bolduc-Duval and Discover the Universe to provide English and French resources, workshops and webinars to help teachers across the country provide astronomy instruction to their students.
 
Credit: Julie Bolduc-Duval

The Dunlap partners with <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/public-outreach/discover-the-universe/">Julie Bolduc-Duval and Discover the Universe</a> to provide English and French resources, workshops and webinars to help teachers across the country provide astronomy instruction to their students. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Julie  Bolduc-Duval</em></span>

JULY 19 2016

Dr. Dustin Lang and his colleague uncover the strongest evidence yet that an enormous X-shaped structure made of stars lies within the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy.
 
Credit: Dr. Dustin Lang; Dunlap Institute

Dr. Dustin Lang and his colleague uncover the strongest evidence yet that an enormous X-shaped structure made of stars lies within the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy.
 
Credit: Dr. Dustin Lang; Dunlap Institute

Dr. Dustin Lang and his colleague uncover the strongest evidence yet that an <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/x-marks-the-spot-at-the-centre-of-the-milky-way-galaxy/">enormous X-shaped structure</a> made of stars lies within the central bulge of the Milky Way Galaxy. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Dr.  Dustin  Lang;  Dunlap  Institute</em></span>

FEBRUARY 6 2017

Using data from the Gaia mission to map the positions of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Jason Hunt and his colleagues discover evidence that our Galaxy’s spiral arms will eventually disappear.
 
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)

Using data from the Gaia mission to map the positions of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Jason Hunt and his colleagues discover evidence that our Galaxy’s spiral arms will eventually disappear.
 
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/R. Hurt (SSC/Caltech)

Using data from the Gaia mission to map the positions of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy, Dunlap Fellow Dr. Jason Hunt and his colleagues discover evidence that <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/speeding-stars-are-evidence-our-galaxys-spiral-arms-will-disappear/">our Galaxy’s spiral arms will eventually disappear</a>.  <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  NASA/JPL-Caltech/R.  Hurt  (SSC/Caltech)</em></span>

JUNE 15 2017

The Greenbank Ammonia Survey, co-led by Dunlap Fellow Dr. Rachel Friesen, releases an image of a 50-light-year long filament of ammonia molecules in the Orion Nebula. The survey will map major, nearby starforming regions.
 
Credit: R. Friesen, Dunlap Institute; J. Pineda, MPE; GBO/AUI/NSF

The Greenbank Ammonia Survey, co-led by Dunlap Fellow Dr. Rachel Friesen, releases an image of a 50-light-year long filament of ammonia molecules in the Orion Nebula. The survey will map major, nearby starforming regions.
 
Credit: R. Friesen, Dunlap Institute; J. Pineda, MPE; GBO/AUI/NSF

The Greenbank Ammonia Survey, co-led by Dunlap Fellow Dr. Rachel Friesen, releases an image of a 50-light-year long filament of ammonia molecules in the Orion Nebula. The survey will map major, nearby starforming regions. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: R. Friesen, Dunlap Institute; J. Pineda, MPE; GBO/AUI/NSF</em></span>

JULY 6 2017

After years of development by the Dunlap and an international collaboration, the Wide Integral-Field Infrared Spectrograph achieves “first light.” It is designed to study colliding galaxies, stellar nurseries and the remnants of exploded stars.

After years of development by the Dunlap and an international collaboration, the Wide Integral-Field Infrared Spectrograph achieves “first light.” It is designed to study colliding galaxies, stellar nurseries and the remnants of exploded stars.

After years of development by the Dunlap and an international collaboration, the <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/instrumentation/spectrographs/wifis/">Wide Integral-Field Infrared Spectrograph achieves “first light.”</a> It is designed to study colliding galaxies, stellar nurseries and the remnants of exploded stars.

AUGUST 28 2017

Dunlap Director, Prof. Bryan Gaensler and colleagues measure the magnetic field of a galaxy five-billion light-years from Earth, evidence that cosmic magnetism appeared early in the life of the Universe.
 
Credit: NASA

Dunlap Director, Prof. Bryan Gaensler and colleagues measure the magnetic field of a galaxy five-billion light-years from Earth, evidence that cosmic magnetism appeared early in the life of the Universe.
 
Credit: NASA

Dunlap Director, Prof. Bryan Gaensler and colleagues <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/record-breaking-galaxy-five-billion-light-years-away-shows-we-live-in-magnetic-universe/">measure the magnetic field of a galaxy five-billion light-years</a> from Earth, evidence that cosmic magnetism appeared early in the life of the Universe.  <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: NASA</em></span>

AUGUST 21 2017

Thousands view a partial eclipse of the Sun at the Dunlap’s eclipse viewing event at the Canadian National Exhibition.

Thousands view a partial eclipse of the Sun at the Dunlap’s eclipse viewing event at the Canadian National Exhibition.

Thousands view a partial eclipse of the Sun at the Dunlap’s <a href=" http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/public-outreach/starfinder/">eclipse viewing event</a> at the Canadian National Exhibition.

SEPTEMBER 7 2017

CHIME, the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, begins its mission to create the largest three-dimensional map of the Universe after years of development and construction at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in B.C. At the Dunlap, Prof. Keith Vanderlinde leads the team of students and postdocs working on CHIME.
 
Credit: Andre Renard; Dunlap Institute

CHIME, the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, begins its mission to create the largest three-dimensional map of the Universe after years of development and construction at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in B.C. At the Dunlap, Prof. Keith Vanderlinde leads the team of students and postdocs working on CHIME.
 
Credit: Andre Renard; Dunlap Institute

CHIME, the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment, <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/instrumentation/chime/">begins its mission</a> to create the largest three-dimensional map of the Universe after years of development and construction at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory in B.C. At the Dunlap, Prof. Keith Vanderlinde leads the team of students and postdocs working on CHIME. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Andre Renard; Dunlap Institute</em></span>

OCTOBER 12 2017

Projects led by Prof. Bryan Gaensler and Prof. Suresh Sivanandam receive a combined $23 million in funding for the development of a radio astronomy data centre called CIRADA and a multi-target, infrared spectrograph for Gemini Observatory called GIRMOS.
 
Credit: Gemini Observatory; AURA

Projects led by Prof. Bryan Gaensler and Prof. Suresh Sivanandam receive a combined $23 million in funding for the development of a radio astronomy data centre called CIRADA and a multi-target, infrared spectrograph for Gemini Observatory called GIRMOS.
 
Credit: Gemini Observatory; AURA

Projects led by Prof. Bryan Gaensler and Prof. Suresh Sivanandam receive a combined <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/23-million-in-new-funding-for-dunlap-institute-astronomers/">$23 million in funding</a> for the development of a radio astronomy data centre called <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/cirada-canadian-initiative-for-radio-astronomy-data-analysis//">CIRADA</a> and a multi-target, infrared spectrograph for Gemini Observatory called <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/girmos/">GIRMOS</a>. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  Gemini  Observatory;  AURA</em></span>

OCTOBER 16 2017

Hubble Fellow and Carnegie-Dunlap Fellow Maria Drout is a member of the team that is the first in history to detect the visible counterpart of an event that generates gravitational waves detected on Earth—the merger of two neutron stars.
 
Credit: Robin Dienel; Carnegie Institution for Science

Hubble Fellow and Carnegie-Dunlap Fellow Maria Drout is a member of the team that is the first in history to detect the visible counterpart of an event that generates gravitational waves detected on Earth—the merger of two neutron stars.
 
Credit: Robin Dienel; Carnegie Institution for Science

Hubble Fellow and Carnegie-Dunlap Fellow Maria Drout is a member of the team that is the first in history to detect the visible counterpart of an event that generates <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/neutron-star-merger-source-of-gravitational-waves/">gravitational waves detected on Earth</a>—the merger of two neutron stars. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Robin  Dienel;  Carnegie  Institution  for  Science</em></span>

WINTER 2018

U of T astronomy grad student Matt Young spends two months in Antarctica helping to install a new camera on the South Pole Telescope, the camera he and Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tyler Natoli (pictured) helped build.
 

U of T astronomy grad student Matt Young spends two months in Antarctica helping to install a new camera on the South Pole Telescope, the camera he and Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tyler Natoli (pictured) helped build.
 

U of T astronomy grad student Matt Young spends two months in Antarctica helping to install a <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/instrumentation/south-pole-telescope-3g/">new camera on the South Pole Telescope</a>, the camera he and Dunlap Fellow Dr. Tyler Natoli (pictured) helped build. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"></span>

FEBRUARY 2018

Prof. Renée Hložek becomes chair of the Collaboration Council of the Simons Observatory to be built in the high Atacama in Northern Chile on the current site of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (pictured). The Observatory will provide a powerful means to study the Cosmic Microwave Background and the early, inflationary Universe.
 
Credit: Atacama Cosmology Telescope

Prof. Renée Hložek becomes chair of the Collaboration Council of the Simons Observatory to be built in the high Atacama in Northern Chile on the current site of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (pictured). The Observatory will provide a powerful means to study the Cosmic Microwave Background and the early, inflationary Universe.
 
Credit: Atacama Cosmology Telescope

Prof. Renée Hložek becomes chair of the Collaboration Council of the Simons Observatory to be built in the high Atacama in Northern Chile on the current site of the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (pictured). The Observatory will provide a powerful means to study the Cosmic Microwave Background and the early, inflationary Universe. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit: Atacama  Cosmology  Telescope</em></span>

MARCH 28 2018

Prof. Roberto Abraham and colleagues announce the discovery of a one-of-a-kind galaxy, one that appears to contain virtually no dark matter, using the Dragonfly Telescope Array.
 
Credit: NASA; ESA; P. van Dokkum

Prof. Roberto Abraham and colleagues announce the discovery of a one-of-a-kind galaxy, one that appears to contain virtually no dark matter, using the Dragonfly Telescope Array.
 
Credit: NASA; ESA; P. van Dokkum

Prof. Roberto Abraham and colleagues announce the <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/how-do-you-make-a-galaxy-without-dark-matter/">discovery</a> of a one-of-a-kind galaxy, one that appears to contain virtually no dark matter, using the <a href="http://www.dunlap.utoronto.ca/dragonfly/">Dragonfly Telescope Array</a>. <br />  <br /><span style="font-size:75%;"><em>Credit:  NASA;  ESA;  P.  van  Dokkum</em></span>